On December 13th, 2017

On December 10th, 2017

On December 10th, 2017

On December 10th, 2017

On December 10th, 2017

Member Spotlight: Paul Conrady

Editor’s Tip:

Your Brain: A Bad Idea?

What Inspires Us?

Benefits of Bumping Up:

Paul Conrady is the founder of Crimeseen.com, the crime solving social network. While operating Edmond Security for 32 years in the Oklahoma City area Paul and his staff began helping those who have been victims of crime by harnessing the power of the internet and crowd sourcing neighbors security assets to solve crime. His local security adviser networking group meets at WorkIT on Thursdays at 11:30am in the conference room.

Check out this great video by News 9

When you’re pushing toward a deadline:

  • listen to music that you know intimately—lyrics, rhythm, key changes, everything
  • use a daylight bulb or lamp
  • nibble on nuts or jerky—no cookies or donuts
  • give yourself 90 second stretching breaks, then right back at it
  • if all else fails, crank up the caffeine

A great way to end this three-part series on creativity and how your brain works is to examine the concept of the bad idea. While certain infamous exploits have truly been bad ideas, when it comes to creativity, bad ideas are worthwhile. Remember that in parts one and two we learned to 1. relax and 2. to put old ideas into a new context. Experts in creativity suggest that point number 3 is to let bad ideas come up without immediately dismissing them.

If you allow a seemingly bad idea to travel through your mind, it will encounter new contexts. How often have you brainstormed with others and someone tosses up a bad idea and then someone says, “hey, wait. That might not be so bad. What if we...”? Bad ideas are a necessary aspect of brainstorming because given the right context, the idea really wasn’t bad in the first place.

If you have enjoyed this series about your brain and creativity, send the editor some feedback at belinda.bruner@gmail.com

Jessica Hannon: “Even if I don't have time to chat with people, just seeing different faces coming in and out feels like it will help the days go smoother...Transparency inspires me. People who aren't afraid to be real, to be vulnerable, and to be honest inspire me! Selflessness inspires me. Plus, free coffee for the win!”

Alex Evers: “My goal is to improve the lives of everyone around me! While I was growing up in Stillwater I didn't feel like there was a lot to do so it is important to me to make sure that there are more safe, fun, and character building activities in the Stillwater community.”

 

 

What things keep Alex and Jessica going? The amenities at WorkIT are great, but really, their passion for helping others takes first place. For Alex, it’s helping people be their very best self through martial arts. Jessica cleans houses and does customer service, and compares these things to helping people: “We're all broken people and if we can be there for each other and leave each other just a little better than we found them, the world would be a better place.”

Belinda Bruner, PhD, started out with the “Basic Plus” membership at WorkIT and quickly found the environment so stimulating that she decided she wanted to “bump up” her package to a shared personal office. (No one is sharing it right now so think about joining her—she’s a good officemate!)

The unexpected benefit of bumping up is that she feels more enveloped in not one but two communities. For the WorkIT community she has given a presentation, set up the relaxation station, and keeps a jar of change in her office that anyone can borrow from if they need one of Brittany’s snacks and they are short a nickel or two. Further, she is finding she is more engaged with the larger community of Stillwater. She is interested in the city and attends meetings regarding its development, all the while talking up WorkIT. She spends and donates more money locally. Generally, bumping up her membership has made her more confident that she belongs. And that is a great feeling!